South Georgia’s Glaciers

This entry is part 4 of 47 in the series British Antarctic Survey
The receding Neumayer Glacier
South Georgia’s Glaciers

South Georgia has been described by many visiting explorers over the years as the island of ice. It is clear to see why when you look at a map and see just how much of the island is made up of glaciers.

Our rib 'Mollie' heading to the Neumayer
Our rib ‘Mollie’ heading to the Neumayer

In the last few weeks I have been out on the boats a few times, not only to resupply the glacial ice on base to make the perfect G&T, but also for boat training and in order to get readings of how far the glaciers have receded.

Neumayer glacier is receding at an incredible rate
Neumayer glacier is receding at an incredible rate

When you hear figures of how quickly these majestic landmarks are receding, it’s easy to breeze over the figures and not fully comprehend the scale of withdrawal. Well to give you an idea, since I arrived in South Georgia nine months ago, the spectacular Neumayer glacier has receded by over a mile. It wasn’t until I looked at the navigation screen (still hundreds of metres from the face) and saw that I was apparently navigating several miles inland that the severity of this change struck me.

GPS clearly locating the boat to be ontop of the glacier
GPS clearly locating the boat to be on top of the glacier

All along the face, it was clear to see more fragilities and cracks appearing and the moraine was full of titanic slabs of glacial debris that dwarfed both the boats.

Crack appearing in the face of the Neumayer
Crack appearing in the face of the Neumayer
A slab of glacial ice from the face of the Neumayer
A slab of glacial ice from the face of the Neumayer

It has been joked by geologists that this withdrawal of a glacier that runs the entire width of the island could result in the formation of North and South South Georgia islands. Realistically, there is most probably land lying beneath the glacier but it’s not inconceivable that these glaciers could be gone in the not too distant future.

Sun trying to push through the cloud on South Georgia
Sun trying to push through the cloud on South Georgia
Molly looking small in front of the Neumayer
Molly looking small in front of the Neumayer

A day later and we were back out on the boats, this time in Cumberland East to drop the boss off on his holidays. This gave us a great excuse to check out the Nordenskjold glacier, named after the expedition that identified Grytviken as a suitable location for South Georgia’s first whaling station in 1902.

More boating and more glaciers - Nordenskjold Glacier out of the cloud
More boating and more glaciers – Nordenskjold Glacier out of the cloud

 

Nordenskjold face spans greater than 4km
Nordenskjold face spans greater than 4km

There must be good quantities of small prey items in this area of the bay as large numbers of fur seals were lingering in the bay, not to mention South Georgia Shags and Antarctic Terns (see below).

It would be nice to think that all this will be preserved for future generations.

South Georgia Shags rafting on some ice in front of the Nordenskjold
South Georgia Shags rafting on some ice in front of the Nordenskjold

St Andrews Bay… Best Holiday Ever

This entry is part 7 of 47 in the series British Antarctic Survey
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View of St Andrews Bay before we dropped down to the colony

I’m often asked how frequently we get let off South Georgia for holidays and to see family. The answer is never!

For an entire year, I am restricted to the island.

But we do get much more freedom than other Antarctic bases and have a very generous travel limit. And we do get ‘holidays’ – kind of – where we get to visit neighbouring peninsulas for a short period with the help of boating support.

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Waves of King Penguins in front of glaciers and mountains

After a hard and very long summer, I took a few days off to visit St Andrews Bay. This is somewhere I have always wanted to visit, since watching David Attenborough documentaries as a kid.

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King Penguin adults entering and exiting the sea

St Andrews Bay is a stretch of land lying at the foot of Mount Skittle on the Barff Peninsula. It stretches 3km from the mountain ranges at each end and 2km between the ocean and the glaciers located at either side.

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More Penguins and more mountains!
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Penguins in front of the Cook Glacier

More spectacular than the bay itself are its residents. St Andrews Bay is home to the largest breeding colony of King Penguins worldwide. Depending on who you talk to, the numbers of penguins residing here are between 400,000 and 600,000. And having visited the colony, I can now understand why there is such ambiguity.

Literally everywhere you look, there are King Penguins. Along the beaches, there is a constant conveyor belt of birds as adults either return to land to feed their chicks or head to sea to stock up on baby food.

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Penguins at dusk
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King Penguin chicks and adults at dawn

We were incredibly lucky to visit the colony at this time of year. Not only was it covered with a thick layer of snow, but also, amongst the adults, were chicks of all different sizes. Surprisingly, there were even a small number of adults still incubating eggs.

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Penguin chicks creching together

I wish St Andrews was on our doorstep but unfortunately not. In fact, in order to reach this spectacular phenomenom, we had to walk 20km across knee deep mountainous terrain in snow shoes. Upon arrival at our St Andrews Bay hut, myself and Robbie, exhausted from walking, ingested a kilogram of chocolate in seconds, which some philanthropist had kindly left for us in the hut.

Visibility wasn't always great which made navigating exciting!
Visibility wasn’t always great which made navigation exciting!
Just out of Hound Bay... Half way there
Just out of Hound Bay… Half way there
South Georgia doesnt do flat... Robbie coming around the back of Mount Skittle (1600ft)
South Georgia doesn’t do flat… Robbie coming around the back of Mount Skittle (1600ft)

Was it worth all the effort and exhaustion …? Well, you decide for yourself. As the saying goes, a picture paints a thousand words, so the rest of this post is silent …

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Icebergs, probably from the peninsula, drifting north past the islands

 

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Chick checking out his surroundings
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Hundreds and hundreds of metres of black and white blobs
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More waves of penguins
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Panoramic of half the colony!
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More penguins (sorry if this title is a little unimaginative!)
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No space on the beach
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Penguin reflections

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Slightly lost elephant seal, amongst all the penguins