Grytviken Whaling Station

This entry is part 31 of 47 in the series British Antarctic Survey
Grytviken and King Edward Point from the top of Mount Hodges
Grytviken and King Edward Point from the top of Mount Hodges

As you all know, I live at King Edward Point, the headquarters of the British Antarctic Survey on South Georgia. It is also home to the Government of South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands and within the bay, we also have a historic whaling station called Grytviken.

An old whaling ship on the South Georgian shores
An old whaling ship on the South Georgian shores

Grytviken was first established by Carl Larsen in 1904 and used as a station for the hunting of whales and elephant seals. Grytviken was home to 300 people at peak running but was thankfully closed down in 1966.

Ernest Shackleton Research Vessel with Grytviken and Mount Hodges behind
Ernest Shackleton Research Vessel with Grytviken and Mount Hodges behind

Now much of the station is rusting away but we have a building and museum team based here during the summer months, whose job it is to maintain the buildings and displays for visiting tourists.

South Georgia Museum run by SG Heritage Trust
South Georgia Museum run by SG Heritage Trust

Many tourists come to Grytviken, not only to see the old whaling station but also because of its relevance to Shackleton. When Shackleton and his men were famously trapped on their ship Endurance before escaping to Elephant Island, he and several members of his crew sailed for help and reached the shores of South Georgia. After they had traipsed across the mountains and glaciers of South Georgia, they eventually reached Grytviken from where they were able to launch a rescue mission.

Shackletons Grave at the cemetery
Shackletons Grave at the cemetery where many tourists come to toast ‘the boss’
Back of Shackletons grave with Mount Duse in the background. 'I hold that a man should strive to the uttermost for his life's set prize... Robert Browning
Back of Shackleton’s grave with Mount Duse in the background. The inscription reads, “I hold that a man should strive to the uttermost for his life’s set prize … Robert Browning”

Another of Grytviken’s attractions is the post office!…

South Georgia's postbox
South Georgia’s postbox

Mount Hodges is 602m and towers behind Grytviken and offers incredible views above the whaling station across the entire Thatcher Peninsula.

View of Mont Duse, King Edward Point and Cumberland Bay
View of Mont Duse, King Edward Point and Cumberland Bay
View of Maiviken and Harpon from Hodges
View of Maiviken and Harpon from Hodges
View of Maiviken from an old Argentinian bunker on the back of Hodges, built during the Falklands war.
View of Maiviken from an old Argentinian bunker on the back of Hodges, built during the Falklands war

Holiday – Part 2

This entry is part 23 of 47 in the series British Antarctic Survey

I started writing the last two blogs with the intention of telling stories from my holiday trip to the Barff, but both times I haven’t made it past my beloved the Macaroni Penguins! Hopefully, this post will give a better description of my three days R+R.

Where to start….? Well, the beginning is as good as anywhere, I suppose. After an early start of preparation and biosecuring all our gear, myself and Ernie were ferried across to the Barff Peninsula by the team. After a brief ‘cuppa’ in the government hut, we loaded our gear up and set off on for Rookery Bay. The walk is about three hours and fairly challenging when carrying all your camping gear but we made good time and even with a couple of stops for snacks, we were soon arriving at our destination.

View down to out bivvy site at Rookery
View down to our bivvy site at Rookery

First thing for us to sort out was our bivvy site, which involved finding shelter from the wind. Instead of lumping a tent over the hill we both opted for bivvy bags, which are basically small waterproof bags you slide into within a sleeping bag. Once unloaded, I headed out to find the closest source of water, which¬†wasn’t as easy as I thought because I kept getting distracted by wildlife.

Within 20m of camp I came across this brown skua taking a dip.
Within 20m of camp I came across this brown skua taking a dip.
Undoubtably the remains of penguin chick still on its head
Undoubtably the remains of penguin chick still on its face

After leaving the skua, it wasn’t long before I heard the haunting calls of displaying Light Mantled Sooty Albatross. So taking another diversion, I made out for the cliff tops where I quickly discovered a single Albatross on the ground, displaying to two overflying Albatross. The grounded bird was sat on what seemed to be a nest bowl but by this time of the season, you would be expecting to see chicks, if it had been successful.

 

Light Mantled Sooty Albatross coming into land at Rookery
Light Mantled Sooty Albatross coming into land at Rookery
Second bird landing within the tussock
Second bird landing within the tussock
Light Mantle Albatross in flight over the sea
Light Mantle Albatross in flight over the sea

With the light fading, I quickly finished my objective, returning to camp armed with fresh water. We soon had it boiling and were tucking into our army chicken tikka ration packs. Content and full of food, we headed to our bivvy bags and watched the numerous satellites and shooting stars pass over head until sleep kicked in.

Last light over the pass we had crossed earlier in the day
Last light over the mountain pass we had crossed earlier in the day

To say it was cold was a massive understatement! At one point the frost was so severe that I found my bivvy bag was frozen to the ground. However, snug inside my sleeping bag, I slept well and was soon waking up for a morning spent within the Macaroni colony.

View above the macaroni colony to see
View above the macaroni colony to sea

Keen to make it back to Coral before the end of the day, the pair of us decided it was best to start making our way after lunch. The walk is fairly spectacular, taking you past flats covered in breeding petrels, up a Gentoo penguin motorway to a small breeding colony, before heading up a steep mountain pass alongside glacial rivers.

View from the top of the pass, down to Rookery, which is the last bit of land you can see.
View from the top of the pass, down to Rookery, which is the last bit of land you can see.

Once at the top, it’s all downhill, navigating through valleys with mountains on all sides, past three huge lakes and back to Coral Hut where we would be spending the next two nights.

View from the top of the pass to the Three Lakes
View from the top of the pass, down to the Three Lakes
Our final descent down to Coral Hut and the seaside!
Our final descent down to Coral Hut and the seaside!

Coral, like most of the South Georgian coastline, is teaming with wildlife. So we most definitely would not be alone….

Antarctic Fur Seal relaxing at Coral
Antarctic Fur Seal relaxing by our hut at Coral