Final Farewell!

This entry is part 47 of 47 in the series British Antarctic Survey
Farewell South Georgia

Absolutely devastated to leave South Georgia after an incredible and life changing year. If anyone gets the chance to visit I would 150% recommend it! It has everything, landscape, wildlife, glaciers and very occasionally the sun also.

Wintering team plus postie!

It was an absolute pleasure spending the year with this team. One final BBQ in the snow as well as a final champagne toast and it was time to set sail on board the Shackleton.

Last views of Mount Duse for a while
One last picture of Grytviken and KEP
The Nordenskjold in the cloud

As to be expected the scenery on the way out was still magnificent and a few species of wildlife made the effort to come and see us off. 

Giant Petrel in front of SG coastline
Our ‘horse and carriage’

On our way North we passed several, huge icebergs which were obviously floating north from the continent

More Icebergs
Different view of the same Icebergs

Once within flying range of the Falklands a Hurricane made a flyby whilst carrying out a training exercise allowing great views for photographs

Flyby
Black Browed over flat seas
Sei Whale in the mist

 

48 Hour Film

This entry is part 38 of 47 in the series British Antarctic Survey

The BAS team based here has now dropped to 7 and it’s a long time since we last saw real people! To stop us going crazy, we have to keep ourselves entertained. As a marine biologist, my favourite pastime would be talking to the animals, but apart from the occasional seal, base is fairly barren of wildlife so we have to find other ways to keep busy.

Not a particularly chatty fur seal on the beach
One of the remaining fur seals for me to talk to. Unfortunately, their conversation is mostly limited to fish.

Luckily, we have lots of snow at the moment so there are opportunities to get out on the hill and ski. Its not quite the same as your standard resort skiing since in order to ski down a hill, you must first ski up it because we have very few chairlifts. Well, none at all, actually.

Skiing above Grytviken
Skiing above Grytviken

Also there are no piste bashers to compact the snow, meaning that even on skis, it’s not uncommon to sink several inches beneath the surface, making falls frequent but landings comfy.

Skiing over Grytviken
Russ skiing around Grytviken

As well as talking to seals and ski-ing, we also we take it in turns every Saturday to provide food and sometimes entertainment for everyone on base. So far this month we have had a Glastonbury themed evening, where we dressed like hippies and watched the downloaded Glasto highlights. We have also had a pizza and quiz night.

Glastonbury stage on King Edward Point
Glastonbury stage on King Edward Point – Photo credit Lewis Cowie

Sometimes the entertainment isn’t thought up within station. Two weekends ago, we participated in the Antarctic 48 Hour Film Competition. This was first thought up by an American base and allows us to compete against all the other bases around the Antarctic continent.

Filming of our 48 film
Filming of our 48 film

The competition starts with an email on the Friday evening which contains a list of various items to incorporate into a 5 minute film. You then have until 0000 Sunday night to write, film, direct and edit your film, and , if you feel confident enough, to submit it for viewing around the Antarctic.

Our entry included daring stunts
Our entry included daring stunts

The film is then judged by your peers based on the acting, filmography and editing, and winners are announced. Having sat through 22 different entries, I was incredibly impressed by the overall standard and creativity, although that can’t be said about every entry! Ours this year was a soof 1970s cop show and was voted as second best overall. If you want to make your own follow this link ….
48 hour film link

Our 48 Hour Film Entry - KEP COP SQUAD
Our 48 Hour Film Entry – KEP COP SQUAD

We also have a very well equipped workshop and the experienced people here have been happy to show me around the machinery, meaning I have been able to improve both metalwork and woodwork skills.

Turning wood in order to make a pen
Turning wood on the lathe
Pen almost complete
Pen almost complete
Grinding Steel
Grinding Steel
Cutting steel
Cutting steel to make a knife

We are also spending lots of time training ourselves on the use of the fine South Georgia fleet so that Russ, our boating officer, feels confident enough to go on holiday!

Anchoring practice of the Jetboat
Anchoring practice of the Jetboat
Driving the ribs is bloody cold at this time of year
Driving the ribs is bloody cold at this time of year
Pride of the KEP fleet, dotty - photo credit Becky Taylor
Pride of the KEP fleet, Dotty – photo credit Becky Taylor

In other news, we had a 7.4 earthquake at the weekend. I am told that base shook considerably and it awoke several members of the team. But apparently, I am a very deep sleeper!

Seismic readings of the earthquake from the British Geological Survey
Seismic readings of the earthquake from the British Geological Survey

 

Onwards….

This entry is part 36 of 47 in the series British Antarctic Survey
View from base
View from base

As winter progresses, so does the work. Trips to Maiviken have become less frequent but are still necessary. Conditions  can be challenging with the temperatures dropping, snow levels increasing and the wind ever present. But once you get there, it is always worth it.

Wind blowing the snow
Wind blowing the snow over Deadmans Pass

With it being winter now, much of the wildlife around base has dispersed and I have to go much further afield to get my wildlife fix. My weekly Maiviken trips offer the perfect opportunity to do this. With summer densities of wildlife at Maiviken being so ridiculously high, even with a dramatic decrease of numbers, there is plenty to keep me on my toes.

Snowy Sheathbill on an icy Maiviken beach
Snowy Sheathbill on an icy Maiviken beach
Snow shoeing to Maiviken
Snow shoeing to Maiviken

Walking conditions are much more challenging now and snow shoes or skis are necessary for most trips. I also have to be aware of the snow/avalanche conditions, whilst walking across steep heavily loaded slopes. Seemingly, there isn’t enough tea in the world to keep my hands warm but that’s life!

More windy mountains
More windy mountains

Although fur seals can sleep at sea, Maiviken beaches provide the perfect place for additional R&R for small groups of seals. Calving of the Neumayer Glacier is apparently quite high at the moment with many of the beaches covered in blocks of glacial ice.

Fur seals 'chilling' on the beaches covered in glacial ice
Fur seals ‘chilling’ on the beaches covered in glacial ice
Fur Seal on a snow covered Maiviken beach
Fur Seal on a snow covered Maiviken beach

Its very rare that you get a still day on South Georgia, so when the snow isn’t falling from the sky, you’re not necessarily safe.

Maiviken hills being swept free of snow
Maiviken hills being swept free of snow

Gentoo penguins will rarely fish overnight and will usually return to rookeries before dusk before heading back out again at dawn. This means that if I get to Maiviken early enough, I get my penguin fix as well.

Gentoo Penguin in the Maiviken tussoc grass
Gentoo Penguin in the Maiviken tussoc grass

Winter time is peak fishing time down here. All boats have to come into the bay so that the Government Officers can inspect the vessels and ensure that they meet the high standards required to fish in these seas. It is also a busy time for our Fisheries Patrol Vessel, Pharos SG, which carries out at sea boardings and is constantly patrolling for illegal fishing.

IMG_2371-HDR
Fishing Vessels in Cumberland Bay
Pharos alongside at King Edward Point
Contrast: derelict remains of Grytviken whaling station, an exploitative and destructive fishing industry, in front of King Edward Point, now proudly home to one of the most sustainable and successfully run fisheries, worldwide.

Wherever you go at the moment, you are not too far from pipits. It’s amazing to see how quickly these guys are recovering after the rat eradication. Just as impressive is how such a diminutive bird is able to survive in such extreme conditions. Birds have resorted to foraging on the tidal line, where the sea melts any snow, and roosting in any pockets free of vegetation they can find.

South Georgia Pipit, fluffed up inside a cave
South Georgia Pipit, fluffed up inside a cave, keeping me company on a tea stop
Looking for food
Looking for food
SG Pipit grubbing around rockpools
SG Pipit grubbing around rockpools
Foraging on the ice
Foraging on the ice

Grytviken Whaling Station

This entry is part 31 of 47 in the series British Antarctic Survey
Grytviken and King Edward Point from the top of Mount Hodges
Grytviken and King Edward Point from the top of Mount Hodges

As you all know, I live at King Edward Point, the headquarters of the British Antarctic Survey on South Georgia. It is also home to the Government of South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands and within the bay, we also have a historic whaling station called Grytviken.

An old whaling ship on the South Georgian shores
An old whaling ship on the South Georgian shores

Grytviken was first established by Carl Larsen in 1904 and used as a station for the hunting of whales and elephant seals. Grytviken was home to 300 people at peak running but was thankfully closed down in 1966.

Ernest Shackleton Research Vessel with Grytviken and Mount Hodges behind
Ernest Shackleton Research Vessel with Grytviken and Mount Hodges behind

Now much of the station is rusting away but we have a building and museum team based here during the summer months, whose job it is to maintain the buildings and displays for visiting tourists.

South Georgia Museum run by SG Heritage Trust
South Georgia Museum run by SG Heritage Trust

Many tourists come to Grytviken, not only to see the old whaling station but also because of its relevance to Shackleton. When Shackleton and his men were famously trapped on their ship Endurance before escaping to Elephant Island, he and several members of his crew sailed for help and reached the shores of South Georgia. After they had traipsed across the mountains and glaciers of South Georgia, they eventually reached Grytviken from where they were able to launch a rescue mission.

Shackletons Grave at the cemetery
Shackletons Grave at the cemetery where many tourists come to toast ‘the boss’
Back of Shackletons grave with Mount Duse in the background. 'I hold that a man should strive to the uttermost for his life's set prize... Robert Browning
Back of Shackleton’s grave with Mount Duse in the background. The inscription reads, “I hold that a man should strive to the uttermost for his life’s set prize … Robert Browning”

Another of Grytviken’s attractions is the post office!…

South Georgia's postbox
South Georgia’s postbox

Mount Hodges is 602m and towers behind Grytviken and offers incredible views above the whaling station across the entire Thatcher Peninsula.

View of Mont Duse, King Edward Point and Cumberland Bay
View of Mont Duse, King Edward Point and Cumberland Bay
View of Maiviken and Harpon from Hodges
View of Maiviken and Harpon from Hodges
View of Maiviken from an old Argentinian bunker on the back of Hodges, built during the Falklands war.
View of Maiviken from an old Argentinian bunker on the back of Hodges, built during the Falklands war

X Rays, Oil Spill and The Navy … again!

This entry is part 29 of 47 in the series British Antarctic Survey

Welcome to another week in the life of a British Antarctic Survey scientist! This week’s events include Oil Spill and X Ray training and, with it being an international weekend in the football calendar, I have news from the South Georgian national team’s latest outing.

Lenticular clouds behind a king penguin at sunrise
Lenticular clouds behind a king penguin at sunrise

Living in South Georgia involves all sorts of weird and wonderful training. Part of living in such a small team in such an isolated location involves being prepared for everything, including tsunamis, shipwrecks and fires.

We also play an important role as first responders to any spillages of potentially hazardous chemicals within a manageable size. Obviously, it is necessary for all the team to be familiar with the Emergency Action Plan and know how to deploy all the equipment. So, this month we rolled out all the equipment in order to first control and then clear up a mock oil spill around the King Edward Point wharf.

Oil Spill Training
Oil Spill Training – booms to contain a spill

We are lucky to have a doctor and surgery here on South Georgia. However, there is only so much that Doc can do alone so it is therefore necessary that we are all trained with some level of medical care in order to assist her or, God forbid, treat her if she hurts herself.

This involves intensive training in the UK before deployment, followed by weekly Doc School once down south. On this week’s agenda was X-Raying. Equipment is limited here so our X Ray machine uses film and we must be able to develop the pictures. Our subject for this practice is an old, frozen Gentoo Penguin from the freezer! You’ll be glad to know it had no broken bones.

Lewis X Raying a frozen Gentoo
Lewis X-Raying a frozen Gentoo

The final piece of training for this month also involved a Major Incident Drill for which the Royal Navy provided the mock, unco-operative casualties. The scenario was a shipwrecked fishing vessel full of conveniently non-English speaking fisherman.

HMS Clyde
HMS Clyde
HMS Clyde in front of Grytviken
HMS Clyde in front of Grytviken

After we had saved the lives of all the people worth saving, we took advantage of the good weather to have another game of football.

Team Photo
Team Photo

The game was strongly contended and this Navy team represented a much greater challenge than previous games. Meteorological conditions were perfect in contrast to the pitch, which is made up of mire, bog and rock. This didn’t affect the level of the play, though, with both teams doing what only the true greats can do by adapting their style of play to the conditions.

Late challenges were more down to the boggy playing conditions than anything else
Late challenges were more down to the boggy playing conditions than anything else

With the wind behind them, the home side settled into the conditions more quickly and were soon peppering the Navy goal with shots. Fortunately for the away team, their keeper possessed many cat-like qualities, pulling out some blinding saves for the cameras.

Noone told us they had a cat playing in goal
No-one told us they had a cat playing in goal!

Tackles were flying in all over the pitch, some timed to perfection but mostly horribly late. Less out of maliciousness but more as a result of the bobbly terrain and low fitness levels.

More mistimed challenges
More mistimed challenges

Not even The Cat in goal could put a stop to the “tica taca” passing which lead to the opening goal. The home team’s passing, which can only be compared to Barcelona, tore through the away defence with Cowie eventually finishing the move and slotting the ball under the helpless keeper.

Cowie opening the scoring for the home team after a flowing move
Cowie opening the scoring for the home team after a flowing move

With the first half approaching its climax, the game was interrupted by an almighty scream. Many dived for cover, concluding that the only possible cause of a scream like that could be a shooting and that maybe we were under attack. However, we eventually discovered this wasn’t the case, but it was almost as bad  – the away team’s right back had been tackled by a tuft of grass.

The devonshire ambulance service coming to the rescue - miraculously the casualty walked again
The Devonshire ambulance service coming to the rescue – miraculously, the casualty was able to walk again

With the casualty carried off, the half drew to an uneventful close, allowing the away team to compose themselves.

The photographer was obviously so thrilled by the match they decided to take pictures of the cloud
The photographer was obviously so enthralled by the match, he decided to take pictures of the clouds instead

Revitalised by their half time oranges and cigarettes, the away team came out a changed team and with the help of the wind, restricted South Georgia to their own half. So relaxed was The Cat about the threat to his goal, after a few minutes he opted to have a cuppa. With the help of some valiant defending and some truly abysmal finishing, the home team hung on and seemed to be heading for an unlikely victory.

The cat was obviously not being worked hard enough in the second half
The Cat was obviously not being worked hard enough in the second half

But with the clock ticking away, the home team did what British Teams do so well and crumbled. With what can only be described as a howler by the keeper (who had been kindly donated by the Navy due to uneven numbers) gifting the equaliser to the Navy by fumbling a  shot, which probably wouldn’t have reached the goal, to the feet of their striker to tap in.

Spectators in fancy dress running down to watch the finale
Spectators in fancy dress running down to watch the finale

With only seconds left, the Navy sensed blood. No sooner had the game kicked off again, the ball was rolling out for an away corner. The Navy piled men forward and after an overhit corner was caught wickedly by the wind and thrown on to the crossbar, it dropped into the six yard box. Tired from their intrepid second-half efforts, South Georgia were slow to react and the ball was scrambled into the net.

After a hard fought game spirits were still high and the home team clapped the deserved winners off the pitch
After a hard fought game spirits were still high and the home team clapped the deserved winners (led by their Man Of The Match) off the pitch

It is always good fun to see people from the outside world even when they beat you at football. The HMS Clyde team were no exception to this and we were happy to invite them into the bar for drinks after the big game.

We look forward to their next visit and hopefully a rematch!

King Penguins seeing off HMS Clyde
King Penguins seeing off HMS Clyde