King Edward Point – Temporary Home

There are definitely worse places to be left in than Cumberland Bay, South Georgia and although we were all itching to make it to Bird Island, I was also keen to take advantage of being back in Cumberland Bay. Given its location on the Leigh side of South Georgia, the weather is much kinder to Kind Edward Point than Bird Island, so I made sure to take advantage of the clear blue skies during the day and night.

View of Grytviken from base at night
Snowy reflections

The travel limit at this station is huge and this means there are always hills to climb; we headed up Mount Duse equipped with crampons and ice axes (which we didn’t actually use) attempting to get a view of Cumberland Bay from above.

The flats beneath Duse
Laura enjoying a plateau above base
Steep climb up Duse
Top of the first climb
Foggy view over Cumberland Bay

Unfortunately, as you can see from the photo, the visibility wasn’t great on Duse but it improved for visits to my old study colonies at Maiviken, which in my humble opinion is one of the best places in the world.

Great to get back and see my old study Gentoo colony. Good numbers back to breed this year
Gentoo Penguin at Maiviken

Another easy hike from base is along to Penguin River, which is always a good place to catch up with Light Mantled Albatross

Light Mantled Albatross over the South Georgia mountains

One thing I won’t see a huge amount of on Bird Island is Elephant Seals. So I was keen to spend a little time with these beautiful beasts. So cute and useless when they’re born, they triple in weight in just three weeks by which time they are left by their mothers and become weaners, which are equally cute and useless – just a little fatter! 

Young elephant seal, unimpressed by its first water experience
Young elephant seal in front of Mount Duse
These big eyes, which are what make everyone love young elephant seals, allow them to pick up light from its bioluminescent prey and find its way in the dark depths of the Southern Ocean
Weaner in the snow

Eventually they will grow into 800kg females or 4 tonne males and return in their thousands to South Georgia to breed. The males will be 50% fat in optimal condition and spend nine months a year at sea-diving to 2400+m in search of their favourite food, squid. 

Two bull seals of different species in one harem of elephant seals

Even in sunny Cumberland Bay, it’s never too long before the next blizzard or snow fall.

Fur Seal bulls take a territory three weeks or so before the females. They will stay here and go without foraging for months in a bid to breed.
Just a week or so old but plenty of fat to keep it warm
Fur Seal in the snow
Skuas in the snow

One final Elephant Seal picture since I can’t imagine there will be many more for a while!

Ciao!
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