British Antarctic Survey Mark II

Southern Rockhopper Penguins

Its been a long while since I wrote a blog but now that I am back settled in colder climes I think it’s about time that I update this website.

I am back in my favourite part of the world living on a small island 500m North West of South Georgia. It’s aptly named Bird Island since its home to hundreds of thousands of seabirds and penguins. So dense is the wildlife here that there is either a seabird or seal every 1.5m2. 

Big Mac is the largest colony on the island and is used by 40,000 pairs of Macaroni penguins 

As with all travel in the Southern Ocean, ‘Plan A’ very rarely comes to fruition. I set off from home via RAF flight to the Falklands where I had a couple days to explore the rich wildlife the islands have to offer. Having been to the Falklands several times now I am still amazed by what’s on show here. With it being located north of the subantarctic convergence the species found here are slightly different and there were great opportunities to see Southern Sea Lions, Rockhopper Penguins and Imperial Cormorants.

The Falklands will literally blow you away with wind and rain almost as predictable as beautiful wildlife!

Thousands of Rockhopper Penguins breed along the cliff tops of the Falklands
Two headed Cormorant

Bull Seal Lions are formidable animals weighing 350kg

I then headed south on board the Naval patrol ship, HMS Clyde. My next destination was Bird Island. 3 days sailing away. As we made our way South on the unusually flat calm seas we were treated to views of fin whales, right whale dolphins, Peale’s dolphins and Humpback whales as well as lots of seabirds. 

Humpback whale alongside the ship close to shore
First of many Wandering Albatross over a flat sea
Giant Petrel over a less flat sea

As I woke up on the 3rdmorning, just north of Shag Rocks, ready for my 5am ice watch on the bridge, we were greeted by a 2 by 3 mile iceberg which had a couple of smaller bergs which had broken off. Fortulately the captain was up on the bridge and suggested we position the ship so that when the sun rises it comes up directly behind the ice berg. And this was carried out to perfection!

HMS Clyde making her way to the Iceberg
Sunrising behind the iceberg
Decent sized chunk of ice!

Unfortunately the next step of the plan worked out less perfectly as we approached Bird Island which is very exposed to the prevailing winds and swell. The decision was made to not even attempt landing meaning we would reposition to my old home at King Edward Point and wait patiently for a different lift. 

Sunsetting over my first views of South Georgia this season
Heading towards Cumberland Bay down a snowy coastline
It amazing to see how many whales there are around South Georgia this year. These are only the second Humpbacks I have ever seen inside Cumberland Bay.
Grey Headed Albatross over the South Georgia mountains
The Nordenskjold glacier still looks as spectacular as ever
Back to my old home, King Edward Point! Temporarily!

There are definitely worst places to be stationed on standby. Read my next blog here

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