This entry is part 36 of 47 in the series British Antarctic Survey
View from base

View from base

As winter progresses, so does the work. Trips to Maiviken have become less frequent but are still necessary. Conditions  can be challenging with the temperatures dropping, snow levels increasing and the wind ever present. But once you get there, it is always worth it.

Wind blowing the snow

Wind blowing the snow over Deadmans Pass

With it being winter now, much of the wildlife around base has dispersed and I have to go much further afield to get my wildlife fix. My weekly Maiviken trips offer the perfect opportunity to do this. With summer densities of wildlife at Maiviken being so ridiculously high, even with a dramatic decrease of numbers, there is plenty to keep me on my toes.

Snowy Sheathbill on an icy Maiviken beach

Snowy Sheathbill on an icy Maiviken beach

Snow shoeing to Maiviken

Snow shoeing to Maiviken

Walking conditions are much more challenging now and snow shoes or skis are necessary for most trips. I also have to be aware of the snow/avalanche conditions, whilst walking across steep heavily loaded slopes. Seemingly, there isn’t enough tea in the world to keep my hands warm but that’s life!

More windy mountains

More windy mountains

Although fur seals can sleep at sea, Maiviken beaches provide the perfect place for additional R&R for small groups of seals. Calving of the Neumayer Glacier is apparently quite high at the moment with many of the beaches covered in blocks of glacial ice.

Fur seals 'chilling' on the beaches covered in glacial ice

Fur seals ‘chilling’ on the beaches covered in glacial ice

Fur Seal on a snow covered Maiviken beach

Fur Seal on a snow covered Maiviken beach

Its very rare that you get a still day on South Georgia, so when the snow isn’t falling from the sky, you’re not necessarily safe.

Maiviken hills being swept free of snow

Maiviken hills being swept free of snow

Gentoo penguins will rarely fish overnight and will usually return to rookeries before dusk before heading back out again at dawn. This means that if I get to Maiviken early enough, I get my penguin fix as well.

Gentoo Penguin in the Maiviken tussoc grass

Gentoo Penguin in the Maiviken tussoc grass

Winter time is peak fishing time down here. All boats have to come into the bay so that the Government Officers can inspect the vessels and ensure that they meet the high standards required to fish in these seas. It is also a busy time for our Fisheries Patrol Vessel, Pharos SG, which carries out at sea boardings and is constantly patrolling for illegal fishing.

IMG_2371-HDR

Fishing Vessels in Cumberland Bay

Pharos alongside at King Edward Point

Contrast: derelict remains of Grytviken whaling station, an exploitative and destructive fishing industry, in front of King Edward Point, now proudly home to one of the most sustainable and successfully run fisheries, worldwide.

Wherever you go at the moment, you are not too far from pipits. It’s amazing to see how quickly these guys are recovering after the rat eradication. Just as impressive is how such a diminutive bird is able to survive in such extreme conditions. Birds have resorted to foraging on the tidal line, where the sea melts any snow, and roosting in any pockets free of vegetation they can find.

South Georgia Pipit, fluffed up inside a cave

South Georgia Pipit, fluffed up inside a cave, keeping me company on a tea stop

Looking for food

Looking for food

SG Pipit grubbing around rockpools

SG Pipit grubbing around rockpools

Foraging on the ice

Foraging on the ice

Series Navigation<< Life’s A BoatScenery >>
Share

One thought on “Onwards….

  1. Great blog once again Jamie always make me so jealous .hope you’re keeping well.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*
*
Website